Nurses who specialize can develop greater expertise and influence over patient outcomes. They can advance in their careers and improve their earning power. Learn about some of the top nursing specialties in demand today.

Nursing is becoming an increasingly specialized profession. 40% of nurses plan to move into more advanced roles and pursue higher education. This bodes well in a market characterized by high demand for nurses with special skills and experience.

Nursing Informatics

Nurses who prefer to spend their time behind the screen instead of in the ward may enjoy taking their career into the realm of electronic file management and data communications. This field integrates the science of nursing with analytics that support healthcare teams and help them to make more data-driven choices.

Nurse Management

Nurse managers dedicate their mentorship talents to creating better healthcare protocols, managing nursing teams, and organizing training programs. Charge nurses can specialize further, becoming dedicated shift supervisors or resource coordinators. Those with communication and leadership skills suit this specialty.

Advanced Practice Nursing

Advanced practice nurses prefer to have an integrated role in patients’ care. They manage long-term therapies for patient groups and often take on their own medical specialty. Continuing education classes and case management certification are needed to become a charge nurse.

Ambulatory Care Nursing

Nursing can be a challenging profession that leads to burnout in some individuals. Others have a natural gift for avoiding compassion fatigue—an ability that’s well suited to ambulatory care nursing. This speciality involves managing and coordinating care with all caregivers, including family, often in the last months of a patient’s life.

Forensic Nursing

Forensic nursing is an emerging discipline that allows nurses to treat crime survivors and support their legal needs. They also collect evidence in the event of a death. Nurses who are activists and advocates at heart choose this field to support patients as well as the causes they’re passionate about.

Nurses who specialize can develop a far more evolved level of expertise and influence over patient outcomes. They can advance in their careers and improve their earning power.

Nursing is becoming an increasingly specialized profession. 40% of nurses plan to move into more advanced roles and pursue higher education. This bodes well in a market characterized by high demand for nurses with special skills and experience.

Nursing Informatics

Nurses who prefer to spend their time behind the screen instead of in the ward may enjoy taking their career into the realm of electronic file management and data communications. This field integrates the science of nursing with analytics that support healthcare teams and help them to make more data-driven choices.

Nurse Management

Nurse managers dedicate their mentorship talents to creating better healthcare protocols, managing nursing teams, and organizing training programs. Charge nurses can specialize further, becoming dedicated shift supervisors or resource coordinators. Those with communication and leadership skills suit this specialty.

Advanced Practice Nursing

Advanced practice nurses prefer to have an integrated role in patients’ care. They manage long-term therapies for patient groups and often take on their own medical specialty. Continuing education classes and case management certification are needed to become a charge nurse.

Ambulatory Care Nursing

Nursing can be a challenging profession that leads to burnout in some individuals. Others have a natural gift for avoiding compassion fatigue—an ability that’s well suited to ambulatory care nursing. This speciality involves managing and coordinating care with all caregivers, including family, often in the last months of a patient’s life.

Forensic Nursing

Forensic nursing is an emerging discipline that allows nurses to treat crime survivors and support their legal needs. They also collect evidence in the event of a death. Nurses who are activists and advocates at heart choose this field to support patients as well as the causes they’re passionate about.