By: Chari Strelow, Client Service Manager
You understand the importance of hiring the right candidate: You not only fill a vacant position but also mitigate the chances you’ll need to repeat the process again when a mis-hire doesn’t work out. Better yet, the right cultural fit can increase the productivity and morale of your current staff. Identifying the right cultural fit is not a one-size-fits-all approach; the right cultural fit for your organization may have different qualities than someone who is a great match for a different organization.

By: Chari Strelow, Client Service Manager

You understand the importance of hiring the right candidate: You not only fill a vacant position but also mitigate the chances you’ll need to repeat the process again when a mis-hire doesn’t work out. Better yet, the right cultural fit can increase the productivity and morale of your current staff. Identifying the right cultural fit is not a one-size-fits-all approach; the right cultural fit for your organization may have different qualities than someone who is a great match for a different organization.

How do you define your culture?


Before we can talk about why cultural compatibility is important, we must first talk about your definition of company culture and how it relates to the hiring process. These aren’t the hard skills you need to fill the position; a cultural fit has the soft skills and personal goals that complement your company’s mission, vision, and values. It also means gauging their preferred work environment and seeing if it matches with yours.

If you don’t have a specific mission statement or list of company values, try asking your current staff members how they view the workplace and about their own personal goals. You may notice similar answers, especially from your more tenured staff. Use their responses as a starting point for creating screening questions to assess whether a potential candidate is a cultural match. It’s also important to assess differences between candidates appropriately.

Cultural compatibility and personal similarities are not the same


A lack of diversity can undermine your staff’s productivity and competitiveness. When we say look for a “good cultural fit,” we don’t mean hire people based on how well they match your current staff by their age, health, educational background, citizenship status, or ethnicity. Hiring someone who is passionate about the same hobbies as you, for example, is also not hiring a company cultural fit.

Hiring based on personal similarities can lead to discriminatory practices and may also backfire if your goal is to create a strong and healthy workplace culture. A staff with similar backgrounds may not share the same goals, so you should focus on their work-related objectives rather than their interests outside of the workplace.

The benefits of hiring a candidate who fits your culture


Employees who feel happy in and motivated by their jobs often contribute more than those who feel otherwise. If your new hire doesn’t mesh with your organization, his or her coworkers, or his or her supervisor, he or she is much more likely to feel dissatisfied with his or her job, underperform, and eventually leave your organization. A mis-hire can have a negative impact on:

  • Customer satisfaction
  • Staff productivity
  • Employee morale
  • Company standards

Those consequences are especially serious in healthcare because mistakes and a lack of caring can put a patient’s health, safety, and well-being at risk.

But if you hire the right cultural fit, that new hire is likely to increase employee satisfaction, productivity, retention rates, and even the mental and physical fitness of that employee. All these factors are crucial for healthcare workers, which means a culturally compatible new hire is worth more than just his or her salary.

What to consider when hiring a good cultural fit


If your company culture is already defined, creating parameters for cultural compatibility are pretty simple. If one of your major goals is to improve patient care, for example, look for someone who is passionate about efforts toward that end. If you have a specific type of patient population, consider someone who enjoys working with that type of patient. Or if you’re hiring for an ER position, it’s imperative to look for someone who can handle stressful situations.

Consider factors such as these when writing your job description and preparing to interview candidates. Try giving them a sense of your culture by letting them meet their potential coworkers and seeing the actual work environment rather than just explaining it. Ask them what they appreciated most about the tour and give them a chance to share their feedback. These answers can be quite telling!

Acclivity Healthcare makes finding the right cultural fit simple


We’re not your average healthcare recruiter. We work to understand your company culture, bringing you the best candidates before they become official job-seekers. Our professional recruiters attract and place top-performing and exceptionally talented healthcare professionals with their best cultural matches. Visit us online or message me on LinkedIn to learn more about our personalized staffing solutions.